INVITATION TO THE 77th WORLD HEALTH ASSEMBLY
INVITATION TO THE 77th WORLD HEALTH ASSEMBLY

This side event will highlight the concerning rise of aggressive digital marketing of breastmilk substitutes, shedding light on its pervasive and misleading impact on pregnant women, parents and society.

HOW NESTLÉ GETS CHILDREN HOOKED ON SUGAR IN LOWER-INCOME COUNTRIES
HOW NESTLÉ GETS CHILDREN HOOKED ON SUGAR IN LOWER-INCOME COUNTRIES

Nestlé’s leading baby-food brands, promoted in low- and middle-income countries as healthy and key to supporting young children’s development, contain high levels of added sugar

DIGITAL MARKETING IS OUT OF CONTROL – BRAZIL CALLS FOR A RESOLUTION TO PROTECT MOTHERS AND BABIES
DIGITAL MARKETING IS OUT OF CONTROL – BRAZIL CALLS FOR A RESOLUTION TO PROTECT MOTHERS AND BABIES

At WHO’s Executive Board (EB) meeting in its Geneva HQ last week, the many serious emergencies caused by conflicts and climate events were on everyone’s minds.

IBFAN STATEMENTS AT THE WHO EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETING
IBFAN STATEMENTS AT THE WHO EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETING

Protection of breastfeeding throughout all WHO local offices – especially from new strategies such as digital marketing that is out of control. WHO has a key role in ensuring policy coherence in WTO and Codex trade rules.

CODEX GREEN-LIGHTS WASTEFUL, SWEETENED, ULTRA-PROCESSED DRINKS FOR OLDER BABIES
CODEX GREEN-LIGHTS WASTEFUL, SWEETENED, ULTRA-PROCESSED DRINKS FOR OLDER BABIES

IBFAN has been attending the 46th Session of the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC46), the United Nations body created in 1963 by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the FAO to develop global food standards.

IBFAN
IBFAN

SINCE 1979, PROTECTING BREASTFEEDING

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The International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN) is an international coalition aiming to improve maternal and infant and young child health through the protection, support and promotion of breastfeeding and optimal complementary feeding. It was formed by a small group of organisations and activists, concerned about the high mortality of formula fed babies, who came together in 1979 at the end of a WHO/UNICEF joint meeting on infant and young child feeding. The meeting had recommended an international code to regulate the marketing of infant formula, bottles and teats and other products marketed as breastmilk substitutes.


OUR FOCUS AREAS

INTERNATIONAL CODE
CODEX ALIMENTARIUS
CONTAMINANTS IN BABY FOODS
HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS


NEWS IBFAN

IBFAN'S SEVEN PRINCIPLES

Click on the images to read each IBFAN Principle.

1

Infants and young children  everywhere to have the right to the highest attainable standard of health.

2

Families, and in particular women and children, have the right to access adequate and nutritious food and sufficient and affordable water.

3

Women have the right to breastfeed and to make informed decisions about infant and young child feeding.

4

Women have the right to full support to breastfeed for two years or more and to exclusively breastfeed for the first six months.

5

All people have the right to access quality health care services and information free of commercial influence.

6

Health workers and consumers have the right to be protected from commercial influence that may distort their judgment and decisions.

7

People have the right to advocate for change that protects, promotes, and supports basic health, in international solidarity.


The IBFAN network is a global coalition formed by nearly 200 citizen groups in over 100 countries

Learn more about the IBFAN network in various parts of the world. Access the following websites or social networks, and soon we will have more links here:

MATERNITY PROTECTION

State of Maternity Protection in 97 countries

An increasing number of women are entering the job market and they need maternity protection to make a balance between their productive and reproductive roles to take care of themselves, their children and their families.

IBFAN Position Paper on Maternity Protection at Work

This paper presents IBFAN’s position on maternity protection at work and the tools for advocacy needed to increase the implementation of measures that enable mothers to participate as equals in the workplace while exercising their reproductive rights to breastfeed.

Breastfeeding after returning to work or study

Many women find ways to continue breastfeeding their baby. Employers and  course providers have certain obligations towards breastfeeding women to support your return to work or study.

100 Years of maternity protection